City of Winchester Trust
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Planning Applications


Some of the most important and influential work of the Trust is in its appraisal of planning applications. The Trust makes carefully considered comments on planning applications taking into account the Planning Policies, the context of the proposal and the effect on its surroundings. To review Planning Applications, the Trust has four Viewing Panels, each with a lay chairman, an architect (normally retired) and two further lay members. The Viewing Panels have written guidelines and check list.

One of the Panels meets each week in the City Planning Office to consider the Planning Applications within the wards of Winchester City and the Panel may also make site visits. The full list of planning applications and the decisions made by the Planning Department are on the Winchester City Council's Website.

The Trust Viewing Panels see between 40 and 60 applications per month, the majority of which are for shop signs, small extensions, conservatories and the like, on which we make no comment. Where we think improvements could be made to the scheme, or it might possibly have a detrimental effect on neighbouring properties, we suggest what might be done to improve it - again, these are usually small relatively uncontroversial proposals. We comment in more detail on the remaining applications, which we feel would have an effect, good or bad, on the immediate area or Winchester as a whole. It is a sad reflection on the standard of design that very few schemes deserve unqualified praise, and consequently most of the applications listed are those to which we have made an objection. The Chairman of the Planning Appraisal Group, Mary Tiles, reports the comments, including any formal objections, to the City Council and, each month to the CWT Council. The monthly reports produced are posted on this website.

The date associated with the applications in the lists on this web site are the dates the application was initially published by Winchester Council Planning Department. The case number is the reference to the application given by Winchester Planning Department. Several of the monthly Planning Reports presented to the Trust Council are shown below.

To explore comments made by the Trust the latest City of Winchester website planning search provides a search facility to find past applications for a property in Winchester and the details include Trust comments.

3rd Dec 2017 Planning Report

Overview
During November we reviewed 53 applications, objected to 5, commented on 23 , and made no comment on 25. As you will have seen from the Report in the Hampshire Chronicle, the new Peter Symonds Arts Faculty building has finally been approved, to the dismay of some local residents. The Trust had not objected to this, feeling that it was a high quality building and that, given the lack of an alternative site that would have received planning permission, the College had done all that it could to minimise impact on residents. It was felt to be important that the College should, as a result, be able to redevelop buildings on the the central campus that would no longer be used by the Arts. This position is very similar to that taken by councillors on he planning committee (which I attended). At this meeting the decision on the development behind 20-21 The Square was deferred for a site visit (after discussion and interventions from Councillor Tait on behalf of the developer/owner). Permission has subsequently been given, contrary to the advice of the City's historic environment officer whose view we had supported. In addition plans for development at 15 Chilbolton Avenue (see above) were approved even though in the Trust's view the proposal was a step backward from the less dense proposal previously approved (15/02884/FUL). Appeal to CALADS by objectors was largely dismissed and the document seems to be seen to be out of date given the change in character of Chilbolton Avenue that is the resulting of the many new developments.

Mary Tiles 03/12/17

Update

New Applications

Appeal & Presentation News


2nd January 2018 Planning Report

Overview
During December the Trust reviewed 41 applications, objected to 3, commented on 23 , and made no comment on 15.
As could be expected in the run up to Christmas and over the interval between Christmas and New Year, there have been somewhat fewer applications coming through the system. One major application has, however, recently been submitted. This is for the development by St Johns at their Colebrook and Chesil Street sites which will result in a total of 31 mostly new, town centre, affordable residential alms house apartments. The Trust had a presentation on this scheme before it was submitted and those attending were impressed by the amount of forward planning and attention to detail that had been undertaken. The application for the Chesil Street site includes a proposal for private foot bridge across the river. The Trust has expressed the view that if this could be made accessible to a wider public, it would be a significant added advantage. Although we understand the many problems involved in building and providing public access to a bridge across the river, it is felt that such a crossing should be kept under consideration by WCC for use by the occupants of the Extra Care facility in Chesil Street.

Mary Tiles 31/12/17


Update

New Applications

Appeal & Presentation News


6th February 2018 Planning Report

Overview
During January the Trust reviewed 48 applications, objected to 9, commented on 18 , and made no comment on 20. There has been an unusual number rather difficult, possibly contentious cases this month. One, which was featured the Hampshire Chronicle before we had chance to look at the application was for the proposed hotel on the High Street. This, as well as the case of the Dance Academy on St Paul's Hill, raises a question about what PAG chairs should be told about the Trust's position on city centre parking, since we need to aim for consistency. Do we take it that if traffic is to be discouraged in the city centre then there should be no requirement that housing (or a hotel) comes with parking provision, so we should not object on grounds of lack of adequate parking? Perhaps we need to be more insistent on the need for adequate bicycle storage.
One trend we have noticed in recent applications is toward 2 storey extensions. Previously we have seen many single story extensions, most of which are approved if they are not excessive. But 2 storey extensions can be much more problematic for neighbours as well as, in many cases, fundamentally changing the appearance of a house.

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Mary Tiles, 05/02/2018


Update

New Applications

Appeal & Presentation News