City of Winchester Trust
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Planning Applications


Some of the most important and influential work of the Trust is in its appraisal of planning applications. The Trust makes carefully considered comments on planning applications taking into account the Planning Policies, the context of the proposal and the effect on its surroundings. To review Planning Applications, the Trust has four Viewing Panels, each with a lay chairman, an architect (normally retired) and two further lay members. The Viewing Panels have written guidelines and check list.

One of the Panels meets each week in the City Planning Office to consider the Planning Applications within the wards of Winchester City and the Panel may also make site visits. The full list of planning applications and the decisions made by the Planning Department are on the Winchester City Council's Website.

The Trust Viewing Panels see between 40 and 60 applications per month, the majority of which are for shop signs, small extensions, conservatories and the like, on which we make no comment. Where we think improvements could be made to the scheme, or it might possibly have a detrimental effect on neighbouring properties, we suggest what might be done to improve it - again, these are usually small relatively uncontroversial proposals. We comment in more detail on the remaining applications, which we feel would have an effect, good or bad, on the immediate area or Winchester as a whole. It is a sad reflection on the standard of design that very few schemes deserve unqualified praise, and consequently most of the applications listed are those to which we have made an objection. The Chairman of the Planning Appraisal Group, Mary Tiles, reports the comments, including any formal objections, to the City Council and, each month to the CWT Council. The monthly reports produced are posted on this website.

The date associated with the applications in the lists on this web site are the dates the application was initially published by Winchester Council Planning Department. The case number is the reference to the application given by Winchester Planning Department. Several of the monthly Planning Reports presented to the Trust Council are shown below.

To explore comments made by the Trust the latest City of Winchester website planning search provides a search facility to find past applications for a property in Winchester and the details include Trust comments.

3rd April 2018 Planning Report

Overview
During March the Trust reviewed 47 applications, objected to 4, commented on 25, and made no comment on 18.
As mentioned previously, we are seeing a trend toward larger extensions more of which are two storey. Some extensions have been on recently built houses. It would be interesting to know what is driving this trend and whether, for example, estate agents are suggesting people buy with a view to extending, whether people with families are wanting to be nearer the City centre, or whether this is just a consequence of the desire to live in larger spaces. By contrast we see developers acquiring properties on large plots, knocking down the original dwelling and redeveloping, at higher density, or acquiring land and that used to be part of a large garden and building on that. The net result is that over time the City, as a built up area, is gradually being developed to a higher density, with some new smaller houses or flats, but at the same time some once modest, mostly older, houses being being significantly extended.

Mary Tiles 01/04/18


Update

New Applications

Appeal & Presentation News


1st May 2018 Planning Report

Overview
During April the Trust reviewed 45 applications, objected to 5, commented on 16, and made no comment on 24.
At the Planning Committee meeting on 26 April there were a couple of instances in which a condition was imposed on new builds restricting the right to permitted development extensions. This is welcome as it makes no sense to evaluate plans which may make what is considered to be maximum acceptable use of a site only to find that shortly after construction an application for extension is made under permitted development. Ad hoc extensions on recently built properties can also disrupt whatever design or rhythm there was to the development and we have seen several cases recently of applications seeking to modify relatively recently constructed properties.
Our panels have become increasingly annoyed by the scale, size and poor design of developments (particularly roof extensions) being permitted under the LDP process, which is treated simply as a legal matter on which there is no ability to offer comments. A separate document giving instances of some of the worst cases seen recently. What counts as permitted development is determined by central government not by WCC, so this is perhaps a matter for Civic Voice especially as there are noises suggesting that the government wishes to further liberalise the rules to permit whole storeys to be added to buildings.

Mary Tiles, 27/04/2018


Update

New Applications

Appeal & Presentation News


5th Jun 2018 Planning Report

Overview
During April the Trust reviewed 39 applications (fewer than last month), objected to 2, commented on 17, and made no comment on 20.
The Trust has started to see two simultaneous applications for extensions; one for single storey and one for two storeys. I suppose the idea is that two storeys would be preferred, but a single storey might be more likely to get approval. One recent case in point was 80 Canon Street a very complex application which would have required on site access from the rear to fully understand. In the event the two storey extension was refused but the one storey extension allowed. More cynically one might see it as a way of getting approval for what would otherwise be a controversial single storey extension.

Mary Tiles 31/05/18

Update

New Applications

Appeal & Presentation News